Tricia Talks Marvel’s Princess Leia on Mos Eisley Comicport

Princess Leia #1 cover

Writing last week about Princess Leia and the context surrounding her character as an empowered female in storytelling resulted in some of the highest hits this site has seen. “Slave Leia Sells? Amy Schumer, Boy Toys and the Star Wars Fandom Double Standard” was tweeted by Bitch Media and acknowledged on Full of Sith. On that podcast, Bryan Young noted that Twitter user @tonks17’s motion to rebrand Slave Leia as Leia the Huttslayer had over 10,000 notes after it was posted on Tumblr. And despite the reported “ire” from Disney|Lucasfilm over the GQ cover, John Boyega noted on Instagram that he was finishing up a photo shoot for the magazine.

Prior to the Huttslayer attire controversy, I joined a fantastic group of women on Mos Eisley Comicport to discuss the conclusion of the Princess Leia miniseries from Marvel.

Today’s episode is a series wrap-up for Princess Leia, with some extremely special guests! Tricia Barr (Co-host of Fangirls Going Rogue, Co-Author of Ultimate Star Wars), Sarah Rodriguez (Author of Agent Carter: Season One Declassified, Co-Host of Woman Up! Podcast) Aarthi D (Co-Host of Back in the Field), and Kelsey Marquart (Editor-in-Chief of Nerdy But Flirty, StreamFriends Co-Host) chime in with their thoughts on Marvel’s first canon Star Wars miniseries!

Back in October 2014, FiveThirtyEight conducted a deep-dive statistical analysis into the gender composition of characters and creators in the comics from Marvel and DC. The number-crunching in “Comic Books Are Still Made By Men, For Men And About Men” reveals that . . . → Read More: Tricia Talks Marvel’s Princess Leia on Mos Eisley Comicport

Slave Leia Sells? Amy Schumer, Boy Toys, and the Star Wars Fandom Double Standard

Amy Schumer GQ kickline

One week after we celebrated our first glimpse of Leia rocking a commanding costume in the behind-the-scenes reel from the The Force Awakens panel at San Diego Comic-Con, which followed two outstanding teasers that proved a mega-franchise movie doesn’t need to stoop to sexualizing any of its characters to generate interest, social media was atwitter over Slave Leia. First, a local Fox station in Philadelphia ran a segment called “Star Wars Action Figure Has Parents Furious” after a father of two daughters took issue with finding Black Series 6” Slave Leia action figures marked “ages 4 and up” in the toy aisle at Target. Later, GQ magazine released images of feminist comedienne Amy Schumer posed provocatively in the Slave Leia costume alongside other famous Star Wars characters.

Judging by the headlines across media outlets, it would appear significant segments of fandom are irate with the local station and the father who instigated its report, as well as with Schumer, who allegedly earned the “ire” of Disney|Lucasfilm. To date, the official Star Wars Twitter account has issued a one-line response, lacking in any actual corporate-level indignation, to fans who reacted to the Schumer images and held Disney|Lucasfilm accountable for them. A short statement from Disney was also released to Variety, along with the admission that parodying the franchise is covered under fair use.

@CPThrio @icecoldpenguin Lucasfilm & Disney didn't approve, participate in or condone the inappropriate use of our characters in this manner

— Star Wars (@starwars) July 16, 2015 . . . → Read More: Slave Leia Sells? Amy Schumer, Boy Toys, and the Star Wars Fandom Double Standard

Killing Your Darlings: The Life and Death of Ahsoka Tano

Hasbro SWCA Vader Ahsoka poster

One of the goals for our podcast Hyperspace Theories is using the perspective of storytelling to inform the process of speculation about future Star Wars tales. While promotional reveals and rumored spoilers can shape fans’ ideas about directions for speculating, getting inside the mind of the storyteller also can provide a basis for anticipating future developments or culling among more likely and less likely possibilities.

Last week Tricia and I were discussing a key decision for any storyteller: writing the death of a fan-favorite character. Certainly neither of us is opposed in principle to “killing our darlings” in stories; anyone who’s read our fiction knows that. At the same time, when carried out poorly such a death can cause a profoundly negative fan reaction and corresponding detrimental impact on subsequent interest in purchasing later stories. In the Legends era, for example, fans were heartbroken by the death of Ton Phanan but still hold the character and his demise in great esteem; by contrast, the death of Mara Jade Skywalker garnered little but ill will and declining sales for the novels. Fans spurn deaths that undermine characterization or themes, lack adequate reasons in the plot, or fail to pay off in future stories, among other flaws – but they also may come to revere a death written with meaning and impact. In other words, although one decision must be whether to kill the character, that choice cannot be separated from the why and how portrayed in the story.

In the course . . . → Read More: Killing Your Darlings: The Life and Death of Ahsoka Tano

Marvel’s Princess Leia #1 Begins Today

Today is the first issue of Marvel’s comic mini-series Princess Leia. . . . → Read More: Marvel’s Princess Leia #1 Begins Today

Kay Reviews Razor’s Edge by Martha Wells

Razor's Edge

Kay reviews Star Wars: Empire and Rebellion: Razor’s Edge by Martha Wells. . . . → Read More: Kay Reviews Razor’s Edge by Martha Wells

More Leia in Star Wars Insider #145!

Leia Constant Spirit

A new Leia story will be featured in Star Wars Insider #145! . . . → Read More: More Leia in Star Wars Insider #145!

Agent of My Own Destiny: A Discussion of Character Agency

Tahiri

What is character agency? Tricia Barr discusses the agency of female characters in Man of Steel, Avengers, Star Wars, Star Trek and Firefly. . . . → Read More: Agent of My Own Destiny: A Discussion of Character Agency

Fangirls Around the Web: San Diego Comic-Con 2013 Edition – Part One: Star Wars

Lisa Curtis Jaina Shirt

Fangirls Around the Web featuring Star Wars at San Diego Comic-Con 2013. . . . → Read More: Fangirls Around the Web: San Diego Comic-Con 2013 Edition – Part One: Star Wars

Coffee With Kenobi Discusses the Ladies of Star Wars

Star Wars Insider 142 cover

Tricia sits down to discuss the ladies of Star Wars with Dan and Correy of Coffee With Kenobi. . . . → Read More: Coffee With Kenobi Discusses the Ladies of Star Wars

Leia’s Ready for Action

Razor's Edge

Martha Well’s Leia novel, Empire and Rebellion: Razor’s Edge, gets a cover. . . . → Read More: Leia’s Ready for Action