Interview with ‘The Secret History of Wonder Woman’ author Jill Lepore

Jill Lepore Secret History Wonder Woman

Priya Chayya interviews Jill Lepore, author of ‘The Secret History of Wonder Woman.’ . . . → Read More: Interview with ‘The Secret History of Wonder Woman’ author Jill Lepore

Fangirls Going Sith

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The Fangirls Going Rogue join Full of Sith for one glorious podcast featuring Darth Bane’s thought bombs. . . . → Read More: Fangirls Going Sith

Fangirls Going Rogue Episode 12: Star Wars is for Everyone!

On this month’s episode of Fangirls Going Rogue, Teresa Delgado and Tricia Barr report back on their convention trips, including interviews with Steve Blum (Zeb) and Greg Ellis (Baron Ruhdor) from Star Wars Rebels. Plus we unveil a new logo courtesy of RebelForce Radio’s Jimmy Mac and artist Chris Amorim.

Listener emails always make us smile, and we’ve received even more mail this month from fanboys who love the show. Star Wars truly is for everyone! One email led to a discussion of ways to give back beyond the costuming fan organizations. Our suggestions include Force For the Cure and Cat Taber’s Games for Soldiers, which we highlighted in our first episode.

The opening of ILM’s studio in London gave us a chance to talk about a couple of important women leading Lucasfilm into the future: Kathleen Kennedy and Lynwen Brennan. Kathleen Kennedy mentioned during the opening that Episode VII filming was nearing its conclusion, which is exciting, and also gave us a chance to talk about spoiler etiquette in the age of social media.

In addition to Teresa’s awesome interviews from Fanboy Expo with the voices of Zeb and Baron Ruhdor, Steve Blum and Greg Ellis, we did a written interview with Star Wars Rebels artist extraordinaire Amy Beth Christenson. She is a lifelong fangirl who was inspired to draw Star Wars by her aunt. We hope you’ll check out her full interview either at FANgirl or Jedi News. Amy Beth Christenson won the Judge’s Choice for the Her . . . → Read More: Fangirls Going Rogue Episode 12: Star Wars is for Everyone!

GeekGirlCon 2014: Heroine’s Journey Panel Recap

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A recap of the standing room only Heroine’s Journey panel at GeekGirlCon 2014. . . . → Read More: GeekGirlCon 2014: Heroine’s Journey Panel Recap

Designing WYNDE’S Heroine’s Journey

Tricia Barr explores the process of creating a heroine’s journey for Vespa in her award-winning space opera WYNDE. . . . → Read More: Designing WYNDE’S Heroine’s Journey

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media’s 2014 Findings

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Today is the third of three global symposiums where the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media will present their findings of a global study of film. The findings of the study still prove that many things have to change to create gender equality for women on film and beyond the camera. Here are some of their findings: . . . → Read More: Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media’s 2014 Findings

WYNDE Around The Web: September 20, 2014

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A nice review for ATHENA’S DAUGHTERS, which includes a short story from WYNDE. . . . → Read More: WYNDE Around The Web: September 20, 2014

Star Wars at GeekGirlCon 2014

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FANgirl will be returning to GeekGirlCon with contributors Linda, Kay, B.J. and Tricia Barr sitting on panels! . . . → Read More: Star Wars at GeekGirlCon 2014

Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part Two

The surprising impact of Steampunk novels on The Heroine’s Journey

A series by Mary Sheridan

PART 2 – STEAMPUNK INFLUENCES: You may not realize that you have been Punk’d

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“There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.”

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Author, Sherlock Holmes

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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a prolific writer. He wrote sixty Sherlock Holmes stories alone, the first in 1887 and the last in 1927. Since Sir Arthur’s lifetime, his Holmes’ character has been copied, borrowed, rewritten, revisited, and retold in print and on film by countless writers, and each time, the brilliant investigator was reinvented. Today, so many variations exist that it would be necessary to revisit the first Holmes novel, A Study in Scarlet, in order to know the character as Conan Doyle intended him.

During the past decade, Mr. Holmes has frequently been written into Steampunk novels and films. Anyone who only knows the character from these recent versions could mistakenly believe that the original Victorian novels were Steampunk.

The greatest Victorian Science Fiction minds – including Jules Verne, Mary Shelley, H. G. Wells, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – are often cited as “Steampunk authors.” Certainly, each penned outstanding stories, but in fact, their Victorian novels seeded the development of contemporary Steampunk. There are those who will argue this distinction, maintaining that Victorian Science Fiction and Steampunk are synonymous, yet history clearly shows that Victorian novels were instead the . . . → Read More: Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part Two

Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part One

The surprising impact of Steampunk novels on The Heroine’s Journey

A series by Mary Sheridan

PART 1 – STEAMPUNK PRIMER: A Definition in So Many Words

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“All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.”

Edgar Allan Poe

Author, The Balloon Hoax

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HOW IS ‘STEAMPUNK FICTION’ DEFINED?

Steampunk is an acknowledged subgenre of Science Fiction and Fantasy. All three members of this literary family exist to answer the same question: “What if?” Beyond this commonality, everyone appears to have their own scholarly or intuitive definition of Steampunk fiction, and as a result, discussion and controversy seem to grow along with the genre’s popularity.

In his book, “Steampunk: An Illustrated History”, best-selling author Brian J. Robb presents ideas from a number of knowledgeable sources to show the complexities of reaching consensus. Robb sets out his own requisite that “altered history” is essential to Steampunk storytelling and more enigmatically suggests that “[Steampunk] is history from the minds of men.”

He quotes Stephen Hunt, author of the popular Jackelian Series of Steampunk novels: “For my work it’s always been the hard fusion between fantasy and the society of the Victorians”; and also Editor Lou Anders, who says, “Steampunk is anachronistic science fiction, chiefly but not exclusively concerned with the nineteenth century. There are those who believe that in order to be true Steampunk a work must be set and centered around Victorian England.”

Robb also quotes . . . → Read More: Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part One