Designing WYNDE’S Heroine’s Journey

Tricia Barr explores the process of creating a heroine’s journey for Vespa in her award-winning space opera WYNDE. . . . → Read More: Designing WYNDE’S Heroine’s Journey

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media’s 2014 Findings

Geena Davis Bad Robot

Today is the third of three global symposiums where the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media will present their findings of a global study of film. The findings of the study still prove that many things have to change to create gender equality for women on film and beyond the camera. Here are some of their findings: . . . → Read More: Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media’s 2014 Findings

WYNDE Around The Web: September 20, 2014

Athenas Daughters Cover

A nice review for ATHENA’S DAUGHTERS, which includes a short story from WYNDE. . . . → Read More: WYNDE Around The Web: September 20, 2014

Star Wars at GeekGirlCon 2014

Fangirls GGC SW Panel

FANgirl will be returning to GeekGirlCon with contributors Linda, Kay, B.J. and Tricia Barr sitting on panels! . . . → Read More: Star Wars at GeekGirlCon 2014

Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part Two

The surprising impact of Steampunk novels on The Heroine’s Journey

A series by Mary Sheridan

PART 2 – STEAMPUNK INFLUENCES: You may not realize that you have been Punk’d

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“There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.”

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Author, Sherlock Holmes

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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a prolific writer. He wrote sixty Sherlock Holmes stories alone, the first in 1887 and the last in 1927. Since Sir Arthur’s lifetime, his Holmes’ character has been copied, borrowed, rewritten, revisited, and retold in print and on film by countless writers, and each time, the brilliant investigator was reinvented. Today, so many variations exist that it would be necessary to revisit the first Holmes novel, A Study in Scarlet, in order to know the character as Conan Doyle intended him.

During the past decade, Mr. Holmes has frequently been written into Steampunk novels and films. Anyone who only knows the character from these recent versions could mistakenly believe that the original Victorian novels were Steampunk.

The greatest Victorian Science Fiction minds – including Jules Verne, Mary Shelley, H. G. Wells, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – are often cited as “Steampunk authors.” Certainly, each penned outstanding stories, but in fact, their Victorian novels seeded the development of contemporary Steampunk. There are those who will argue this distinction, maintaining that Victorian Science Fiction and Steampunk are synonymous, yet history clearly shows that Victorian novels were instead the . . . → Read More: Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part Two

Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part One

The surprising impact of Steampunk novels on The Heroine’s Journey

A series by Mary Sheridan

PART 1 – STEAMPUNK PRIMER: A Definition in So Many Words

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“All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.”

Edgar Allan Poe

Author, The Balloon Hoax

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HOW IS ‘STEAMPUNK FICTION’ DEFINED?

Steampunk is an acknowledged subgenre of Science Fiction and Fantasy. All three members of this literary family exist to answer the same question: “What if?” Beyond this commonality, everyone appears to have their own scholarly or intuitive definition of Steampunk fiction, and as a result, discussion and controversy seem to grow along with the genre’s popularity.

In his book, “Steampunk: An Illustrated History”, best-selling author Brian J. Robb presents ideas from a number of knowledgeable sources to show the complexities of reaching consensus. Robb sets out his own requisite that “altered history” is essential to Steampunk storytelling and more enigmatically suggests that “[Steampunk] is history from the minds of men.”

He quotes Stephen Hunt, author of the popular Jackelian Series of Steampunk novels: “For my work it’s always been the hard fusion between fantasy and the society of the Victorians”; and also Editor Lou Anders, who says, “Steampunk is anachronistic science fiction, chiefly but not exclusively concerned with the nineteenth century. There are those who believe that in order to be true Steampunk a work must be set and centered around Victorian England.”

Robb also quotes . . . → Read More: Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Part One

Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Introduction

Steampunk Heroines

The surprising impact of Steampunk novels on The Heroine’s Journey

A series by Mary Sheridan

INTRODUCTION

It is the visual images of Steampunk that first grab our attention, but the fantastical nature of its fiction invites us to step into the parlor for tea with the storytellers.

What is Steampunk, you ask?

Magic and illusion intertwined with reality; history bending to imagination. Science abused by impossible theories to create implausible yet ingenious contraptions, and readers willing to suspend all logic, because in the fantasy worlds of Steampunk a popular historical paradigm is in play. Authors and readers feel a sense that what appears improbable might actually be possible.

If you haven’t read Steampunk and are wondering what to expect, the following paragraphs are a mash-up of themes; a contrived sampling of a few sights and sounds not quoted from specific novels but imagined for this Fangirl series as a glimpse at Steampunk’s fictional range. As preposterous as this compilation of complexities may seem, similar individual elements can be found in most Steampunk novels.

Something mysterious, or worse, follows a familiar-looking man into the swirling fog that hangs in the dark and empty streets of old London. A pack of dogs wail in the near distance. Beneath a gaslight, the shadow of a tall figure turns a cloaked arm in his direction. Icy fear raises hairs on flesh that glows orange as the flamethrower approaches. The man with a familiar face does not hear Big Ben ring the midnight hour.

The . . . → Read More: Steampunk and the Heroine’s Journey: Introduction

Path Dependence in Star Wars Storytelling

In Star Wars lore, Yoda famously described a variation on path dependence, too: “Once you set foot down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny.” Path dependence has a long history in prior Star Wars stories, and its impact will be felt on all of the new Star Wars stories coming in the years ahead. . . . → Read More: Path Dependence in Star Wars Storytelling

Tricia Joins Star Wars in the Classroom Spec Ops Team

Fangirls GGC SW Panel

Tricia joins Star Wars In The Classroom’s Spec Ops Team. . . . → Read More: Tricia Joins Star Wars in the Classroom Spec Ops Team

Fangirls Around the Web: August 24, 2014

Fangirls Around the Web for August 24, 2014. . . . → Read More: Fangirls Around the Web: August 24, 2014